Author Topic: Howdy y'all!  (Read 1650 times)

flymoron

  • Eleven Mile Lake
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Howdy y'all!
« on: September 30, 2013, 07:39:13 AM »
I am glad to be here, I live in Arkansas but I travel to Colorado about every 1-2 yrs, but I have never fished there. I am mainly a warm water fly fisherman, and I essentially know nothing about cold water fly fishing(hence the handle), any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

flymoron

blueskyfly

  • Pacific Tarn Lake
  • *****
  • Posts: 2293
    • View Profile
Re: Howdy y'all!
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 09:38:32 AM »
A few things might help get a response could be what area of the state you plan to fish, type of fish and time of the year.  I have fished the streams in Ark, Mo and S.E Oklahoma mountains and you have some pretty decent waters in the region. Blue Skies on your trip when ever that may be.
Mike Newell

flymoron

  • Eleven Mile Lake
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Howdy y'all!
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2013, 04:29:58 AM »
I usually visit the Estes Park/RMNP area between May to October, because of my health I try to stay below 10,000 ft.

knute

  • Pacific Tarn Lake
  • *****
  • Posts: 1344
    • View Profile
Re: Howdy y'all!
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2013, 09:23:49 PM »
Welcome fm.   I still feel like a "moron" ever now and then even though I have a number of years into the fly stuff now.  Humble comes back to some of us at times whether we like it or not.  Might check out Kirk's Fly Shop website for intel on RMNP pursuits.  Also, might PM Sagetrout.  He's got a lot of experience in the park.  Good luck.

Rick

  • Colorado Mountain Man
  • Administrator
  • Pacific Tarn Lake
  • *****
  • Posts: 6690
    • View Profile
    • Colorado Mountain Fishing
Re: Howdy y'all!
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2013, 06:23:50 AM »
Great to have you on the site... for the park you must have two flies a grasshopper and an ant.  Of course they dont work all the time but they are my best flies in the park.
The worst part of losing good fish is that you cannot release them. They tailwalk across the back of your mind for days.' - Christopher Camuto