Author Topic: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish  (Read 3698 times)

Highcountry

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C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« on: July 02, 2008, 02:00:54 PM »
Here’s some good information on catch and release that ALL fisherman should know and review every so often.

A couple of links with good information........

http://www.gofishbc.com/tips_articles/catch_release.htm

http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/mnr/pubs/fishing/catch_and_release_review_and_guidelines.pdf

I pulled out the main points.

Hope this helps.

Catch-and-Release Guidelines

Most catch-and-release research to date has focused on examining species-specific responses to potential factors which affect mortality. However, due to the large number of studies that have been completed to date, a number of general trends are emerging. Thus, while caution should be used when applying species-specific findings to other species, the following recommendations are, given the available knowledge base, general guidelines to be used to reduce catch-and-release mortality for most species.

Angling Techniques

• Circle hooks should be used as they will minimize the chance of deep hooking.
• Barbless hooks are recommended as they are easier to remove and therefore reduce handling time.
• The use of live/organic bait should be discouraged as it increases the likelihood of deephooking.
• The use of artificial lures should be encouraged.
• Fishing lines must not be left unattended as unattended lines have a greater chance of deeply hooking a fish.
• Fishing line used should be appropriate to the species of fish being sought. This will prevent line breaking and reduce playing time.
• Avoid angling during extreme water temperatures, both hot and cold, if you plan on releasing your catch.

Landing a Fish

• Angled fish should be retrieved as quickly as possible to prevent fish exhaustion.
• Where a landing net is required, it should be knotless and preferably made of soft rubber.
• When landing extremely large fish (e.g. muskellunge), the use of landing cradle should be considered.

Handling and Photographing a Fish

• Keep fish in the water as much as possible to minimize air exposure.
• Never place your fingers through gills or in the eyes.
• Don’t hold heavy fish by the jaw as this may damage the jaw and vertebrae.
• Hold large fish horizontally and support its body to avoid damage to the internal organs.
• Use wet hands or wet cloth gloves to handle the fish.
• Have camera ready prior to landing fish to minimize air exposure.
• If possible, photograph the fish while in water.

Unhooking a Fish

• Have longnose pliers available to back the hook out.
• Remove the hook quickly, keeping the fish underwater.
• If the fish is deeply hooked, cut the line and release the fish as quickly as possible.
• Avoid using stainless steel hooks as they take longer to corrode if left in the fish.

Depressurization

• Avoid fishing deeper (5-6 m) waters if you intend to release your catch.
• Consider depth of capture when deciding on whether or not to release a fish.
• Release the fish quickly after it is landed.
• Avoid artificial swim bladder deflation (“fizzing”).

Revival

• If there is current, hold the fish upright, facing into the current.
• If there isn’t any current, gently move fish back and forth in the water until gill movements return to normal and it is able to maintain its balance.
• When the fish begins to struggle, let it swim away.
Life is better served next to a high mountain lake.

Rick

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 02:26:39 PM »
I wrote an article on this a while ago it can be found http://www.coloradomountainfishing.com/trouthandling.html  not as in depth as the others.

The worst part of losing good fish is that you cannot release them. They tailwalk across the back of your mind for days.' - Christopher Camuto

Highcountry

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 02:46:59 PM »
Great article Rick!  I need to be more careful and not lay fish on the ground to take a pic as much as I have.
Life is better served next to a high mountain lake.

silvertip8k

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2009, 10:03:54 PM »
good info guys...an excellent guidline I wish every angler...no matter how long in the sport, would read and follow...I would wager to say that a very large percentage of fly fishers do not know or understand this topic adequately...much to the chagrin of us all!

I will only add my 3 cents here...the newer ghost nets or similar black rubber ones you see popping up everywhere nowadays are an excellent advance for all of us C&R anglers...also for those of us that use the "dropper" method on both nymphing and dry fly fishing , it will save countless time on the stream...the rubber bags dont abrade the scales and skin of the fish...and dont get hooks so easily tangled...especially droppers etc(in other words...lose those black mesh nightmares already!)

many of the previous steps required to be good stewards of our resource are not necc with these...most time's it is not even required to touch the fish at all...I just pinch the rubber mesh around the fish, having my forceps right there and ready...all this while the fish is still underwater...carefully and precisely get the hook out( I also recommend crimping down barbs on hooks too while rigging)

I do this a lot where propper C&R is not only mandatory...but also a sign of being a responsible angler...recovery time on even large fish is drastically reduced...and this helps guarantee that someone else can enjoy catching it...improper release techniques not only hurt fish, but at certain ranches where I guide , if proper procedures are not religiously followed , I would not be allowed to return and assist anglers...period!

this may ruffle a few feathers...a point I think should be made more often is not using the super light weight gear just to have more "fighting time"...and learning how to use a drag properly is essential...this is just a selfish expression that is a sign to me that the angler cares more about his fun than the precious resource we all share...ie...2 & 3 weight rods( and less) on fish over 12"s is inappropriate...JMHO...r emember just because a fish swims away does not in any way guarantee that it does not find a hole and turn over on his side and expire !

I have made the analogy before comparing a nice trout say 18-24" to a 3 1/2 + year old buck or Bull...unlike hunting, if we learn to C&R properly...many people can share the equivalent of a Pope & Young...and that is what it is all about...to me now the proper release of a beautiful trout is a crowning part of my experience...

of course if pics are part of the equation...and I like them probably more than most, getting your hands wet and getting the camera ready and shot set up etc before you actually grab the fish...remember...if time of involvement, and improper exposure to the out of water environment is kept to the absoloute minimum, and avoiding overtiring fish ,we will see more and more experiences with these special creatures...

again great article and remarks...iI hope I did not bore anyone to death...if we all police and help educate our fellow anglers on these matters, it will enhance things for us all...especially the younger anglers...they are for sure the future!..and maybe a better term is new anglers...there are a lot of 40+ folks that are just now getting into the artform...I never take anything for granted...I always make sure that the release is emphasized as much as the technique to catch and land trout...



this fish actually jumped out of the net after I got his hook released...I hope to catch him again...I raised the fish out of the water for a brief second just to get a better pic of the real vivid colors...it is 19" in this pic...maybe next year it will be a 22+ ;) ;)


all the best...ted
« Last Edit: September 03, 2009, 10:31:46 PM by silvertip8k »
ted ...wandering monk/trout bum
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public land pope & young
public water 20"er
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Dang old king

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2009, 03:08:52 PM »
The last time I got into a discussion on "proper fish handling techniques" for C&R I was summarily bashed by every fisherman on the site... not this site..
The bottom line is. There are right and wrong way's to Catch and Release fish... I don't want to get in to "MY OPINNION" on how too.. I will protect my quarry the way I was taught..
by Lefty Kreh, Dr.Gary Borger and Doug Swisher.. There is no doubt in my mind that my release' all have a 100% survival rate...
those techniques are:
1 short play.. play your fish as fast as possible(especially in warm water)
2 Nets of non abrasive material. if cloth wet it 1st (never hold your fish in the net suspended or thrashing around if the fish is thrashing set the net back in the water and invert the fish)  RUBBER IS THE BEST NET OF ALL
3 wet bare hands to handle your catch
4 invert the fish (upside down) to remove any tackle.. it disorients them and calms in one motion (especially BROWNS)
5 when reintroducing a fish that has been played .. put it in a slower section of an oxygenated run and  take your time let them recover(swim out of your submerged hand) before you let them go.
Use this and your fish will be there for you on your next adventure...

LOOK HOW RED THOSE FINGERS ARE... MAN IT WAS COLD I HAVE STARTED USING LAYTEX GLOVES UNDER MY JERSY'S..PEEL OF THE JERSY'S AND USE THE LAYTEX TO HANDLE IN COLD WEATHER
« Last Edit: September 16, 2009, 07:56:23 AM by Rick »
im·ma·ture  (m-tyr, -tr, -chr)
adj.
1. How boring people describe fun people

Jay

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2009, 09:40:40 PM »
Here is some added info; http://recycledfish.org/home/?p=28
* Jay  

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2009, 06:41:53 PM »
Here is some added info; http://recycledfish.org/home/?p=28
* Jay  
Lots of good info, Thanks for the Link..one proviso... gloves...not so much.. but thats just me don't take it the wrong way,please...A life time of Angling and, well lets just say I have all my fingers after fishing frozen or dang near frozen water and I  think I left a minimal impact on my catch.. (no finger prints)..JMHO..not a point of contention..
im·ma·ture  (m-tyr, -tr, -chr)
adj.
1. How boring people describe fun people

silvertip8k

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Re: C&R - Tips On Handling Fish
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2009, 09:53:10 PM »
after fishing w/ DOK he showed me some dead fish w/the finger prints...unbelievable... except he showed me the facts...wet your hands guys...and use the rubber bags...'nuff said...t
ted ...wandering monk/trout bum
Ps. 24:1
public land pope & young
public water 20"er
www.wmflyrodco.com